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[阅读小分队] 【Native Speaker每日训练计划】No.2837文史哲

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发表于 2020-7-11 22:47:01 | 显示全部楼层 |阅读模式
内容:Inge Zhou 编辑: Vera Pan

Wechat ID: NativeStudy / Weibo: http://weibo.com/u/3476904471


Part I: Speaker

3 ways to create a space that moves you, from a Broadway set designerDavid Korins, February 2018

You don't have to work on Broadway to design a set, says creative director David Korins -- you can be the set designer of any space in your life. Sharing insights from his work on hits like "Hamilton" and "Dear Evan Hansen," Korins offers a three-step process to start creating the world you want to live in.with return-to-work talent.

Source: TED
https://www.ted.com/talks/david_korins_3_ways_to_create_a_space_that_moves_you_from_a_broadway_set_designer?language=en
[Rephrase 10:36]



Part II: Speed


Screening Room: Lights, Curtain, Action: Backstage with the Man Who Illuminates “Hamilton”Sarah Larson, August 26nd 2019

[Time 2]
“It’s like the sun-comin’-up-in-the-morning kind of thing,” Brian (Rizzo) Frankel, a Broadway lighting technician, says about stage lighting, in a new six-minute short produced by The New Yorker’s video team. “It brings everything to life. Sets the mood for the day. It’s sunny or cloudy—same thing with lighting onstage.” The video gives us a behind-the-scenes look at Frankel’s particular celestial realm: “Hamilton.” Frankel, a veteran of both the Air Force and Broadway—he’s been in the business since 1980—is long-haired and goateed, with necklaces, bracelets, a wildly patterned shirt, and a genial, easygoing manner. Since 1994, he’s worked at the Richard Rodgers Theatre, on West Forty-sixth Street, “Hamilton” ’s home for the past four years. He’s in charge of the show’s spotlight, and also all of its electricity. “I’m an electrician first, spotlight second,” he says.
[138 words]

[Time 3]
As the film begins, we journey with Frankel as he drives into Manhattan and then the theatre district, where he busts the chops of a police officer. His Broadway neighborhood has a busy and friendly air, and, he says, he knows all the cops, the firefighters, the diner workers, the hot-dog guys. Frankel arrives at work at the stage door, by the imposing “Hamilton” marquee (“the most exciting musical of the decade”), on a street festooned with ads for “Manilow Broadway,” “Tootsie,” and something the Washington Post called “electrifying.” Inside, Frankel gets to work on the set of “Hamilton,” with its hanging ropes, wooden beams, and revolving center stage, testing the lights and electricity. He goes backstage, into the lighting booth, into the house, checking details all around the theatre. “Lampposts are good!” he calls out.

The video short offers perspective on theatre lighting’s past, via archival Broadway footage (a marquee featuring Jerry Orbach in “Chicago”; Annie embracing her dog, Sandy) and Frankel’s memories—in the eighties, he says, he worked at the Hudson Theatre, which was still using gas footlights—and it appreciates the present creative moment, too. “Hamilton” is a “special thing,” Frankel says. “Having a standing ovation every night? For four years straight? You know, they’re seeing history.” The film illuminates Frankel’s place in that history, in a way that we feel viscerally at the end: at a performance of “Hamilton,” wearing a headset in the lighting booth, hand on the console, he happily mouths along with the end of one memorable song. (“I am not throwing away my shot! ”) As it ends—bam!—he triumphantly hits the lights.
[272 words]

Source: the New Yorker
https://www.newyorker.com/culture/screening-room/lights-curtain-action-backstage-with-the-man-who-illuminates-hamilton



Where You Can See the Stars of ‘Hamilton’ Now
- Since their time in the Broadway show, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Leslie Odom Jr. and company have gone on to movies, TV and theater.
Nancy Coleman, July 4th 2020

[Time 4]
When a hip-hop musical chronicling the life of a Treasury secretary made its way uptown to Broadway in 2015, a fair number of the faces onstage were still relatively unknown.

Many know the story of what would come next: “Hamilton” became an instant hit, sweeping up praise and accolades and drawing an army of devoted fans. There were the 11 Tonys, not to mention the Grammy, the Pulitzer Prize and the Kennedy Center Honor. Critics heralded the show as transformative, emblematic of a new age in American musical theater.

And the original cast? The mix of Broadway veterans and newcomers was elevated to a status of celebrity that theater performers rarely reach.

The show that will long be considered their most memorable performance is now immortalized onscreen, filmed over three days in the summer of 2016 and now showing on Disney+. Here’s what the original cast members have been working on since their time in the show.

Lin-Manuel Miranda

His character in the show: Alexander Hamilton.

His career since then: Whenever it feels like you’ve got too much on your plate, like you can’t possibly do it all, we invite you to look at Miranda’s workload since he left the show.

The musical’s creator and original Hamilton was already well-known in the theater world as the composer and lyricist for the Tony-winning “In the Heights” (2008), his first Broadway show. And after the success of “Hamilton,” he has kept busy: He wrote songs for “Moana” in 2016 and starred in “Mary Poppins Returns” last year. On the small screen, he appeared in the series “His Dark Materials” on HBO as well as “Fosse/Verdon” on FX, which he also helped executive produce. He returned to Broadway late last year with “Freestyle Love Supreme,” the improvised hip-hop musical sketch show he helped create. Coming up, he has a role in and served as a producer on the film adaptation of “In the Heights,” and he’s working on two new songwriting projects for Disney: an animated musical set in Colombia and a live-action remake of “The Little Mermaid,” for which he is writing new lyrics with the original composer, Alan Menken. He is also slated to direct a film adaptation of the Jonathan Larson musical “Tick, Tick … Boom!” for Netflix.
[378 words]

[Time 5]
Leslie Odom Jr.

His character in the show: Aaron Burr. Odom won the Tony Award for best actor in a musical for his turn as Hamilton’s perilously ambitious rival.

His career since then: He has released two albums and has had roles in such films as the 2017 mystery “Murder on the Orient Express” and the 2019 biopic “Harriet.” Odom is also set to star in several films, including Regina King’s “One Night in Miami” (he’s playing Sam Cooke), John Ridley’s “Needle in a Timestack” and the “Sopranos” prequel, “The Many Saints of Newark.”

Renée Elise Goldsberry

Her character in the show: Angelica Schuyler. Goldsberry was a familiar face on Broadway — she had already appeared in “Rent,” “The Lion King” and the original cast of “The Color Purple” — before her performance as the eldest Schuyler sister earned her the Tony for best featured actress in a musical.

Her career since then: She has turned her focus to film and TV, appearing in the 2019 Trey Edward Shults drama “Waves” and playing the title character, alongside Oprah Winfrey, in “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” (2017) — the HBO film adaptation of the 2010 best-selling book. She has been starring in the Netflix sci-fi series “Altered Carbon” since 2018.

Phillipa Soo

Her character in the show: Eliza Hamilton, Alexander’s wife.

Her career since then: Soo’s most recent stage role was Off Broadway, in “Tumacho” — a supernatural Western comedy that ran for less than a month before the pandemic shuttered live performances. Her other shows post-“Hamilton” have had somewhat longer runs, including “Amélie” on Broadway, where Soo played the title role in the musical based on the 2001 French film, and “The Parisian Woman,” where she appeared alongside Uma Thurman. Onscreen, Soo will next be seen in “The Broken Hearts Gallery,” a romantic comedy slated to premiere in theaters next month. She’s also voicing the moon goddess Chang’e in the Netflix animated musical “Over the Moon” later this year.
[326 words]

[Time 6]

Daveed Diggs

His characters in the show: Marquis de Lafayette and Thomas Jefferson. His dual role led to a Tony win for featured actor in a musical.

His career since then: He went on to star in the 2018 film “Blindspotting,” which he also co-wrote. But he has spent much of the past several years in television, most recently starring in TNT’s “Snowpiercer,” the dystopian thriller series adapted from Bong Joon Ho’s 2013 film. He also appeared on “black-ish,” “Central Park,” “The Get Down” and “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt.” Diggs was part of the rotating cast of “Freestyle Love Supreme” on Broadway with fellow “Hamilton” castmates Miranda and Christopher Jackson, and a documentary about that show is scheduled to premiere on Hulu on July 17. Up next are two Disney projects: He’s providing a voice in the Pixar tale “Soul” and playing Sebastian in the live-action “The Little Mermaid.”

Anthony Ramos

His characters in the show: John Laurens, a fellow revolutionary, and Hamilton’s son Philip.

His career since then: Ramos’s biggest role will come in another Lin-Manuel Miranda project — as leading man Usnavi in the film adaptation of “In the Heights,” due next summer. He has also starred in Spike Lee’s Netflix reboot “She’s Gotta Have It” and on the big screen appeared in “A Star Is Born” (2018) and the recent “Trolls World Tour.” Ramos will also have a role in the film “Honest Thief” later this year, alongside Liam Neeson and fellow “Hamilton” veteran Jasmine Cephas Jones, who happens to be his fiancée.

Jasmine Cephas Jones

ImageThe actress opposite Peter Dinklage in a production of “Cyrano.”
The actress opposite Peter Dinklage in a production of “Cyrano.”Credit...Jeenah Moon for The New York Times
Her characters in the show: Peggy Schuyler, the youngest Schuyler sister, and Maria Reynolds, Hamilton’s mistress.

Her career since then: She moved Off Broadway in 2019, starring in the musical “Cyrano” alongside Peter Dinklage. She also appeared in HBO’s “Mrs. Fletcher” and “Girls” and continues to work with other cast members from “Hamilton”: She was in “Blindspotting” with Diggs, and will be in “Honest Thief” with Ramos and “One Night in Miami” with Odom.

Jonathan Groff

His character in the show: King George III.

His career since then: Groff’s most recent onstage role was a full 180 from the pompous caped monarch he played several years ago. In the “Little Shop of Horrors” revival that opened Off Broadway in 2019, the royal dramatics were replaced with a steep drop in confidence as Seymour, the nerdy flower-shop worker charged with handling a man-eating plant. Last year, Groff also reprised his role as Kristoff in “Frozen 2” (with his own campy ’80s ballad to sing this time around) and has starred in Netflix’s significantly less cheery series “Mindhunter.”

Christopher Jackson

His character in the show: George Washington.

His career since then: Jackson was a Broadway veteran (his credits include Miranda’s “In the Heights”) when he joined “Hamilton.” After he left the show, he was a rotating guest on the Broadway show “Freestyle Love Supreme” through closing night earlier this year. He appeared in “When They See Us” on Netflix and sang the father of “Moana” in 2016. He also stars in “Bull” on CBS, which he began filming while still in “Hamilton.”

Okieriete Onaodowan

His characters in the show: Hercules Mulligan, another revolutionary, and James Madison.

His career since then: Onaodowan took over for Josh Groban in “Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812” on Broadway. On the small screen, he has appeared on “The Get Down,” “Girls” and “BoJack Horseman.” But his main role has been playing the firefighter Dean Miller through three seasons of the “Grey’s Anatomy” spinoff “Station 19.”
[614 words]

Source: the New York Times
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/04/movies/hamilton-anthony-ramos.html?action=click&module=RelatedLinks&pgtype=Article

Part III: Obstacle



‘Hamilton’ Review: You Say You Want a Revolution
- The filmed version of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s founding-father Broadway musical arrives just in time — vital and more challenging than ever.
A.O. Scott, July 10th 2020

[Paraphrase 7]
The opening scenes of the filmed version of the Broadway musical “Hamilton,” which starts streaming on Disney+ on Independence Day weekend, pull you back in time to two distinct periods. The people onstage, in their breeches and brass-buttoned coats, belong to the New York of 1776. That’s when a 19-year-old freshly arrived from the Caribbean — the “bastard, immigrant, son of a whore” who shares his name with the show — makes his move and takes his shot, joining up with a squad of anti-British revolutionaries and eventually finding his way to George Washington’s right hand and the front of the $10 bill.

ROUNDTABLEOur critics debate ‘Hamilton’ as it shifts from stage to screen.
But this Hamilton, played with relentless energy and sly charm by Lin-Manuel Miranda, who wrote the music, book and lyrics, also belongs to the New York of 2016. Filmed (by the show’s director, Thomas Kail, and the cinematographer Declan Quinn) in front of a live audience at the Richard Rodgers Theater in June of that year, the movie, while not strictly speaking a documentary, is nonetheless a document of its moment. It evokes a swirl of ideas, debates, dreams and assumptions that can feel, in the present moment, as elusive as the intrigue and ideological sparring of the late 1700s.

“Hamilton,” which premiered at the Public Theater in early 2015 before moving to Broadway and then into every precinct of American popular culture, may be the supreme artistic expression of an Obama-era ideal of progressive, multicultural patriotism.


Casting Black and Latino actors as the founding fathers and their allies — Daveed Diggs as Thomas Jefferson and the Marquis de Lafayette, Christopher Jackson as George Washington, and Leslie Odom Jr. as Hamilton’s mortal frenemy Aaron Burr — was much more than a gesture of inclusiveness. (Jonathan Groff channels the essential, irreducible whiteness of King George III.) The show’s argument, woven through songs that brilliantly synthesized hip-hop, show tunes and every flavor of pop, was that American history is an open book. Any of us should be able to write ourselves into it.

Alexander Hamilton, the first secretary of the Treasury and an architect of the American banking system, was Miranda’s chosen embodiment of this belief: an outsider with no money and scant connections who propelled himself into the center of the national narrative through sheer brains, talent and drive. Miranda shares some of his hero’s ambition and intelligence, and turns Hamilton into an avatar of modern American aspiration. Just like his country, he sings, he’s “young, scrappy and hungry.”

The tale of his rise fuses individual striving and collective struggle. For all his sometimes comical self-regard (he has a pickup line about “my top-notch brain”), Hamilton doesn’t measure success just in personal terms. That’s Burr’s great shortcoming: He scrambles after power and prestige without taking a risk or committing himself to a principle. But Hamilton wants to make his mark by making a difference. Self-making and nation-building are aspects of a single project.

“Hamilton” is a brilliant feat of historical imagination, which isn’t the same as a history lesson. Miranda used Ron Chernow’s dad-lit doorstop the way Shakespeare drew on Holinshed’s Chronicles — as a treasure trove of character, anecdote and dramatic raw material. One of the marvels of the show is the way it brings long-dead, legend-shrouded people to vivid and sympathetic life. The close-ups and camera movements in this version enhance the charisma of the performers, adding a dimension of intimacy that compensates for the lost electricity of the live theatrical experience.

[‘Hamilton’ isn’t the only great thing on Disney+ — here are the 50 best things to watch on the streaming service.]

The glib, dandyish Jefferson is a perfect foil for Hamilton: his rival, his intellectual equal and his sometimes reluctant partner in the construction of a new political order. Though Hamilton hates it when Washington calls him son, the father of the country is also a warm, sometimes stern paternal presence in his protégé’s life. The duplicitous Burr may be the most Shakespearean figure in the pageant, a gifted man tormented and ultimately undone by his failure to make himself matter.

Not that public affairs are the only forces that move “Hamilton.” I haven’t forgotten the Schuyler sisters, who have some of the best numbers and who somewhat undermine the patriarchal, great-man tendencies inherent in this kind of undertaking. Miranda weaves the story of revolutionary ferment and the subsequent partisan battles of the early national era into a chronicle of courtship, marriage, friendship and adultery that has its own political implications. Angelica Schuyler (the magnificent Renée Elise Goldsberry), the oldest of the three sisters, is a freethinker and a feminist constrained by the narrowness of the options available to women of her time and class. Her sister Eliza (Phillipa Soo), who marries Alexander, is saved from being reduced to a passive, suffering figure by the emotional richness of her songs.

Still, the personal and the political don’t entirely balance. “Can we get back to politics?” Jefferson demands after an especially somber episode in Hamilton’s family life, and it’s hard to keep from sharing his impatience. The biographical details are necessary to the structure and texture of the show, but it is fueled by cabinet debates and pamphlet wars, by high rhetoric and back-room dealing, by the glory and complexity of self-government.

Again: This isn’t a textbook. Liberties have been taken. Faults can be found. The problem of slavery isn’t ignored, but it has a way of slipping to the margins. Jefferson’s ownership of slaves is cited by Hamilton as a sign of bad faith (“your debts are paid because you don’t pay for labor”), but Washington’s doesn’t come up.

“Hamilton” is motivated, above all, by a faith in the self-correcting potential of the American experiment, by the old and noble idea that a usable past — and therefore a more perfect future — can be fashioned from a record that bristles with violence, injustice and contradiction. The optimism of this vision, filtered through a sensibility as generous as Miranda’s, is inspiring.

It’s also heartbreaking. One lesson that the past few years should have taught — or reconfirmed — is that there aren’t any good old days. We can’t go back to 1789 or 2016 or any other year to escape from the failures that plague us now. This four-year-old performance of “Hamilton,” viewed without nostalgia, feels more vital, more challenging than ever.

Its central questions — “Who lives, who dies, who tells your story?” — are staring us in the face. Its lyrics are an archive of encouragement and rebuke. Over the years, various verses have stuck in my head, but at the moment I can’t get past the parts of “One Last Time” that are taken, word for word, from Washington’s farewell address, ghostwritten by Hamilton. And I can’t escape tears when the outgoing president hymns “the sweet enjoyment of partaking, in the midst of my fellow-citizens, the benign influence of good laws under a free government.”
[1153 words]

Source: the New York Times
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/30/movies/hamilton-review-disney-plus.html?action=click&module=RelatedLinks&pgtype=Article




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发表于 2020-7-12 23:23:27 | 显示全部楼层
T2: 2'17
T3: 2'35
T4: 1'52
T5: 2'14
T6: 2'43
OBSTACLE: 11'17
发表于 2020-7-12 23:31:37 | 显示全部楼层
OB:
takes his shot
played with relentless energy and sly charm
It evokes a swirl of ideas, debates, dreams and assumptions that can feel, in the present moment, as elusive as the intrigue and ideological sparring of the late 1700s.
The show’s argument, woven through songs that brilliantly synthesized hip-hop, show tunes and every flavor of pop, was that American history is an open book.
was Miranda’s chosen embodiment of this belief: an outsider with no money and scant connections who propelled himself into the center of the national narrative through sheer brains
comical self-regard
He scrambles after power and prestige without taking a risk or committing himself to a principle.
One of the marvels of the show is the way it brings long-dead, legend-shrouded people to vivid and sympathetic life. The close-ups.
sometimes stern paternal presence in his protégé’s life
a gifted man tormented and ultimately undone by his failure to make himself matter.
Miranda weaves the story of revolutionary ferment and the subsequent partisan battles of the early national era into a chronicle of courtship.
it is fueled by cabinet debates and pamphlet wars, by high rhetoric and back-room dealing
can be fashioned from a record that bristles with violence, injustice and contradiction.
发表于 2020-7-12 23:38:03 | 显示全部楼层
OB:10:58
发表于 2020-7-13 10:08:52 | 显示全部楼层
Hamilton review: You say you want a revolution
[Time]6’54

Bastard: 讨厌的
Scrappy:散乱的
Foil:金属片
Ferment: 发酵,纷乱
Pamphlet:小册子
Rebuke:斥责
Benigh:慈祥的和蔼的
发表于 2020-7-13 23:39:40 | 显示全部楼层

T2: 2'33
T3: 2'45
T4: 1'58
T5: 2'16
T6: 2'49
发表于 2020-7-14 09:05:30 | 显示全部楼层
T2 1'03''
T3 2'16''
T4 2'39''
T5 2'26''
T6 4'21''
T7 8'25''
发表于 2020-7-21 22:12:32 | 显示全部楼层
T2: 1'15
T3: 2'44
T4: 3'37
T5: 3'10
T6: 5'32
发表于 2020-7-22 20:39:55 | 显示全部楼层
OB:11‘32
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